Archives for posts with tag: integrins

The movement of cells in the body is of great importance to our lives. For us to learn a language, to fight a cold, to heal a wound, to grow a pair (of arms, say), cells must migrate to the right place at the right time. So cell migration must be tightly controlled – throughout our entire lives.

Cells have many in-built control mechanisms that ensure their appropriate movement, but we still don’t fully understand how these various mechanisms operate.

In new work, published in the Journal of Cell Science this week, Guillaume Jacquemet and others identify a way that cells can coordinate proper cell migration. The research is highlighted by the journal editors and features on the cover of the journal.

Journal of Cell Science cover, 2013, vol. 126 (no. 18) // Image by Mark Morgan & Guillaume Jacquemet // Reproduced with permission from the authors and The Company of Biologists Ltd

Journal of Cell Science cover, 2013, vol. 126 (no. 18)

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements
Proteomics Clinical Applications cover, 2012, vol. 6 (no. 7-8) // Image by Adam Byron // Reproduced with permission from Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA

Proteomics Clinical Applications cover, 2012, vol. 6 (no. 7-8)

My image features on the cover of the current issue of the journal Proteomics Clinical Applications.

Read the rest of this entry »

My paper has been published in the current issue of the journal Proteomics. The paper also makes the cover of the issue, which is a special issue on the theme of Cancer Proteomics.

Proteomics cover, 2012, vol. 12 (no. 13) // Images by Adam Byron & Sue Craig // Reproduced with permission from Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA

Proteomics cover, 2012, vol. 12 (no. 13)

Read the rest of this entry »

I attended the recent “Signaling by Adhesion Receptors” Gordon Research Conference (24-29 June) and associated Seminar (23-24 June) in Waterville, Maine, USA. The topics of both meetings covered research on signal transduction involving cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. These interactions are essential for a multicellular existence. Unsurprisingly, when these processes go wrong, disease is often a consequence, and the implications of adhesion signalling in cancer were frequently discussed during the meetings.

Maine Lobster // Image by Adam Byron

Read the rest of this entry »

Three of my images have been shortlisted for the European Proteomics Association (EuPA) 2012 Proteomics Photography and Graphic Arts Contest. The three images illustrate different aspects of proteomics, which is the study of all proteins in a given system, such as a cell. You can vote for your favourite image here.

Supercomplexity // Image by Adam Byron

Read the rest of this entry »